Tuesday Tracks: Your Weekly New Music Discovery – Oct. 23

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The Greeting Committee

The Greeting Committee

Every week, there’s a plethora of new music at our fingertips.

Artists on platforms such as Spotify and Bandcamp are plentiful, and the radio offers a steady deluge of new singles, but who has time to sort through all that? RIFF does!

We pooled our resources to find some of the best new singles from all genres and backgrounds, so you can find your newest earworm without all the drama. Enjoy this week’s hidden gems:

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My Brightest Diamond, “It’s Me On the Dance Floor” – Shara Nova is the voice of the duo that calls itself My Brightest Diamond. Her voice is as attention-grabbing as the project name. The single’s intro uses hauntingly eerie organ styling to create scary but intriguing aura. Its slow-burn crescendo culminates with synthetic percussion bringing in Nova’s Florence-and-the-Machine-meets-Kimbra vocal. Her proficient instrumentation juggles funky reverb and acoustic guitars. This single stands out for its use of ominous electro-club sound.

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Wild Child, “My Town” — Wild Child is a septet with a Southern twang, hailing from Texas. The band’s alt-country sound takes influence from its hometown of Austin, but its soft-spoken harmonies and looming atmosphere give it a distinct feel of apocalyptic folk. “My Town” has a looming and foreboding atmosphere, to which its music video only adds with its haunting depictions of the Texas desert. The ghost town imagery complements stripped-down electric guitar, contrasting gloomy strains with folky serenity. The song’s crescendo increases the blues rock vibe with melancholy licks and a plodding backbeat, but it remains consistent with gorgeous vocal melodies and folksy arrangement.

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The Moth and The Flame, “The New Great Depression” – These Los Angeles alternative rockers soak their sound in catchy bass lines and provocatively introspective lyricism. Lead singer Brandon Robbins takes audiences on a pilgrimage, playing on themes of self-awareness and dealing with mental illness:  “The monster in my head is ruthless,” he sings. The arrangement of this song feels somewhat simple, but when paired with such sensitive lyrics, one cannot help but empathize for whoever the story is about.

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The Greeting Committee, “Birthday Song” – This Kansas City indie folk band tells Daughter-esque soft-spoken little stories, like the one in “Birthday Song.” The song is about a boy’s heartbreaking 8th birthday, following the divorce of his parents. He blows out his handles wishing for a reunion that never comes. Singer Addie Sartino’s heartbreaking lyricism pairs with stripped-down guitar and piano for sad nostalgia. “Birthday Song” bears its melancholy soul.

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Adia Victoria, “Dope Queen Blues” – This single has a bass line and rhythm that is strikingly akin to “Always Something There To Remind Me,” by Naked Eyes. Framing her worldview with an authentic feminist angle, Adia Victoria champions women and their experiences. “Dope Queen Blues” has a nice balance of ’80s femme and contemporary resonance. The hypnotic melody balances out a downtempo beat at the latter portion of the song. As Victoria uses her dreamy falsetto to bring listeners into the more complex bridge, the swaying, jazzy instrumentation creates an intoxicating atmosphere.

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Vic’s Pick – I have to give the win to The Greeting Committee for the band’s insightful storytelling and evocative musicianship on “Birthday Song.” Sartino’s personal life informs the narrative about the 8-year-old boy, adding vividness to the story she tells. Anyone dealing with a situation so vulnerable and agonizing can empathize with the heartbroken birthday boy.

Follow writer Vic Silva at Twitter.com/VicSilvaaaa.

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