PHOTOS: Interpol closes ‘Marauder’ Tour at the Greek Theatre

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Interpol performs at the Greek Theatre in Berkeley on Oct. 6, 2018. Photos: Chloe Catajan

BERKELEY — A disco ball might seem like the last thing you’d pair with gloomy post-punk music, but Interpol made it work. Against a darkened Greek Theatre, the mirrored streaks of light gave scattered glimpses of the band, playing up its enigmatic persona. The Berkeley performance on Saturday was the final night of Interpol’s tour in support of 2018 record Marauder.

Interpol performs at the Greek Theatre in Berkeley on Oct. 6, 2018.

After emerging onstage to “Interlude 2,” off this year’s LP, the post-punk revivalists dove straight into eerie slow-burner “Pioneer To The Falls,” from 2007’s Our Love To Admire. Interpol next picked up the pace with “If You Really Love Nothing,” and then continued to alternate between albums from all over its catalog.

Even with Marauder’s notably thicker sound, the new songs mixed naturally with the old in concert. The high-speed energy of “If You Really Love Nothing” was met with the angsty hysteria of 2002 cut “Roland.” The set then simmered down with “Public Pervert” and “All The Rage Back Home,” from 2004’s Antics and 2014’s El Pintor, respectively.

Even with only occasional thank-yous and a moment to appreciate the venue’s grandeur, there was an understood connection between Interpol and fans. Songs like “Not Even Jail” and “Slow Hands” caused the crowd to erupt with exhilaration. If they weren’t dancing, fans instinctively clapped along. Every emotion was accentuated by the stage lights, which switched between strobes and dense, solid colors. For moodier songs like “Leif Erikson” and “Rest My Chemistry,” the stage would turn the deepest of blue or blood red.

Interpol capped the night with a three-song encore that consisted of “Lights,” “Flight of Fancy” and “Stella Was a Diver and She Was Always Down.”

The Kills perform at the Greek Theatre in Berkeley on Oct. 6, 2018.

British band The Kills preceded the headliners with an electric mix of garage rock and electronic grooves. Alison “VV” Mosshart and Jamie “Hotel” Hince were constantly on the move. Both kept in sync with every single beat with hairflips and synergized dancing, all of which proved infectious. Songs like “Future Starts Slow” and “List of Demands (Reparations)” had many head-banging and shimmying in full swing.

Sunflower Bean opened the show, playing a selection of songs that often fused high-voltage post-punk with elements of psychedelic and indie rock. The New York trio, comprised of vocalist-bassist Julia Cumming, guitarist-vocalist Nick Kivlen and drummer Jacob Faber, executed its eclectic sound with animated stage presence and candy-colored lights to match. Songs like “I Was a Fool” and “Human For” even featured Kivlen singing through a telephone to achieve a lo-fi effect. The set included more fan favorites such as the breezy-paced “Easier Said” and coming-of-age anthem “Twentytwo.”

Follow editor Chloe Catajan at Instagram.com/riannachloe and Twitter.com/riannachloe.

(2) Comments

  1. Thomas

    Show was disappointing on a couple levels. Tired sounding was the band, the set list was more than they had to bring to their last show of the tour. Stage strobes were seizure inducing and fully distracting. The disco ball was effective, surprisingly. Left wishing that Interpol and i, both, brought and took away more from the Greek Theatre.

  2. thomas petrola

    Show was disappointing on a couple levels. Tired sounding was the band, the set list was more than they had to bring to their last show of the tour. Stage strobes were seizure inducing and fully distracting. The disco ball was effective, surprisingly. Left wishing that Interpol and i, both, brought and took away more from the Greek Theatre.

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